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Ingredient
Plant Extract,  Skin-Soothing,  Texture Enhancer,  Viscosity Control, 

Acacia Senegal Gum

Good

Herb that can have skin soothing properties, but is used primarily as a thickening agent.

Emollient,  Preservative,  Texture Enhancer,  Antistatic, 

Behentrimonium Chloride

Good

Skin-conditioning agent and emulsifier.

Preservative, 

Benzoic Acid

Good

Preservative used in skincare products; it is considered less sensitizing than some other forms of preservatives.

Emollient,  Plant Extract,  Texture Enhancer,  Fragrance, 

Caprylic/Capric Triglyceride

Best

Derived from coconut oil and glycerin, itŠ—Ès considered an excellent emollient and skin-replenishing ingredient. ItŠ—Ès included in cosmetics due to its mix of fatty acids that skin can use to replenish its surface and resist moisture loss. Caprylic/capric triglyceride can also function as a thickener, but its chief job is to moisturize and replenish skin. This ingredientŠ—Ès value for skin is made greater by the fact that itŠ—Ès considered gentle.Reference for this information:Food and Chemical Toxicology, January 2000, issue 1, pages 79-98

Plant Extract,  Texture Enhancer,  Viscosity Control,  Fragrance, 

Carrageenan

Good

Seaweed gum used in cosmetics as a thickening agent with water-binding properties.

Emulsifier,  Texture Enhancer,  Surfactant, 

Ceteareth-20

Good

Fatty alcohol that is used to thicken cosmetics and keep ingredients mixed together and stable.

Emollient,  Emulsifier,  Texture Enhancer,  Viscosity Control,  Surfactant, 

Cetearyl Alcohol

Good

Fatty alcohol that is a mixture of gentle cetyl and stearyl alcohols. ItŠ—Ès used as an emollient, texture enhancer, foam stabilizer, and carrying agent for other ingredients. Can be derived naturally, as in coconut fatty alcohol, or made synthetically. It is almost always combined with similar-feeling ingredients to create a productŠ—Ès texture and influence its slip when applied to skin.Cosmetic products labeled "alcohol free" are allowed to contain cetearyl alcohol, whose effects are quite different from skin-aggravating forms of alcohol. We repeat: fatty alcohols like cetearyl alcohol do not pose a risk of sensitizing skin.Reference for this information:FDA Labeling Claims, 2014http://www.cosmeticsinfo.org/ingredient/cetyl-alcohol

Emollient, 

Cetyl Palmitate

Good

The ester of cetyl palmitate and palmitic acid, this thickener and emollient helps smooth and condition dry skin. The ingredients that comprise cetyl palmitate are naturally-occurring fatty acids. It may be derived from animals but can also (and is usually) derived from plants or manufactured synthetically.

Preservative, 

Chlorphenesin

Good

Type of alcohol used as a preservative in cosmetics.

Preservative, 

Dehydroacetic Acid

Good

A synthetic preservative used in amounts of 0.6% or less where itŠ—Ès proven to be safe and effective. Dehydroacetic acid is characterized as a white to cream crystalline powder. Sometimes its salt form (known as sodium dehydroacetate) is used, as it is more soluble in certain types of cosmetic formulas. Dehydroacetic acid is most effective on fungi.

Uncategorized,  Viscosity Control,  Solvent, 

Dimethyl Isosorbide

Good

Dimethyl isosorbide is a clear, slighlty oily-feeling liquid that functions as a solvent and may be plant-based or synthetic. It is also used to decrease the thickness of products, such as keeping a liquid in its fluid form rather than wllowing it to rever to a lotion (or, in cosmetics chemistry parlance, a thicker emulsion).

Preservative,  Moisturizer,  Miscellaneous, 

Ethylhexylglycerin

Good

A synthetic skin-softening agent also used as a preservative, a carrier, or suspending agent for other preservatives such as phenoxyethanol.

Skin-Replenishing,  Skin-Restoring,  Moisturizer,  Solvent, 

Glycerin

Best

Also called glycerol or glycerine, glycerin is a humectant thatŠ—Ès present in all natural lipids (fats), whether animal or vegetable. It can be derived from natural substances by hydrolysis of fats and by fermentation of sugars; it also can be synthetically manufactured, which is usually the case with modern-day skincare products.Glycerin is a skin-replenishing and restoring ingredient, meaning it is a substance found naturally in skin, helping to establish normal balance and hydration. ItŠ—Ès one of the many substances in skin that helps maintain a healthy look and feel, defending against dryness and working to maintain skinŠ—Ès moisture level. Essentially, glycerin is a master at hydration, and works best when combined with other replenishing and emollient ingredients.Some people wonder whether using products with glycerin takes too much water from skin when there isnŠ—Èt enough humidity in the air. This can occur with pure glycerin (100% concentrationŠ—”an amount thatŠ—Ès never used in skincare products). Any humectant (including glycerin) used in pure form can increase water loss by attracting water from the lower layers of skin into the surface layers when the climate is too arid (low humidity). For this reason, glycerin and humectants are typically used in concentrations of 5% or less and always combined with other ingredients to soften skin. In fact, glycerin combined with other emollients and/or oils is a fundamental cornerstone of most moisturizers.References for this information:International Journal of Cosmetic Science, August 2016, ePublicationBritish Journal of Dermatology, July 2008, pages 23-34Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology, June 2007, pages 75-82Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, June 2003, pages 7,360-7,365

Preservative, 

Phenoxyethanol

Good

Common cosmetics preservative that's considered one of the least sensitizing for use in formulations. It does not release formaldehyde. Phenoxyethanol is approved worldwide (including in Japan and in the EU) for use in all types of water-based cosmetics, up to a 1% concentration.

Cleansing Agent,  Emulsifier,  Surfactant, 

Polysorbate 20

Good

Antioxidant,  Skin-Restoring,  Vitamin, 

Retinol

Best

Name for the entire vitamin A molecule. Retinol is a powerhouse ingredient that has value for skin on several fronts: ItŠ—Ès a skin-restoring, wrinkle-smoothing, firming ingredient and an antioxidant, allowing it to improve a variety of skin concerns, most related to visible signs of aging.Packaging is a key issue, so any container that lets in air (like jar packaging) or sunlight (clear containers) just wonŠ—Èt cut it. Lots of retinol products come in unacceptable packaging; these should be avoided because the retinol will most likely be (or quickly become) ineffective. Look for opaque, airless, or air-restrictive packaging.Many consumers are concerned about the percentage of retinol in anti-aging products such as serums or moisturizers. Although the percentage can make a difference (especially if itŠ—Ès too low), itŠ—Ès not helpful in understanding how a retinol product will benefit your skin. Far more important is the delivery system, packaging, and the other ingredients present with the retinol.ξUsing a product with a range of anti-aging ingredients plus retinol is far more valuable for skin than using a product with only a supposedly high percentage of retinol. Skin needs far more than any one ingredient can provide, however great that one ingredient may be. See our article on this topic for detailed information.There are several myths about using retinol with other anti-aging ingredients or products, such as those with vitamin C or exfoliants like glycolic acid. See our article on this topic to learn what the research has shown to be true.References for this information:Journal of Drugs in Dermatology, March 2015, pages 271-280Dermatology, May 2014, pages 314-325Dermatoendocrinology, July 2012, issue 3, pages 308-319Toxicological Research, March 2010, pages 61-66Archives of Dermatology, May 2007, pages 606-612The Journal of Pathology, January 2007, issue 2, pages 241-251Clinical Interventions in Aging, December 2006, pages 327-348

Solvent,  Miscellaneous, 

Water

Good

Most widely used cosmetic ingredient; water is almost always listed first on an ingredient label because it is usually the ingredient with the highest concentration in the formula. Despite claims of skinŠ—Ès need for hydration and claims regarding special types of water, it turns out that water may not be an important ingredient for skin. Only a 10% concentration of water in the outer layer of skin is necessary for softness and pliability in this part of the epidermis. Studies that have compared the water content of dry skin with that of normal or oily skin do not find a statistically significant difference in moisture levels between them.

Emulsifier,  Surfactant,  Solvent, 

Isoceteth-20

Emollient, 

Hexadecyl Isononanoate

Emollient, 

Ethyl Linoleate

Emulsifier,  Viscosity Control,  Solvent, 

Glyceryl Stearate & PEG-100 Stearate

Moisturizer,  Surfactant, 

Inulin Lauryl Carbamate

Solvent, 

Maris Aqua

Emulsifier,  Surfactant, 

Sucrose Laurate

Emulsifier, 

Ceteareth-12

Viscosity Control,  Solvent, 

1,3-Propanediol

Viscosity Control, 

Natural Xanthan Gum

Anti, 

A-Bisabolol

This formulation combines two forms of next-generation retinoid actives:

a) A 2% concentration of Granactive Retinoid which is a complex of solubilized Hydroxypinacolone Retinoate (HPR). HPR is a highly-advanced form of retinoid which is, in fact, a non-prescription ester of all-trans direct retinoic acid that offers a multi-fold better effect against signs of ageing than retinol, retinyl palmitate and nearly all other forms of non-prescription retinoid;

b) A sustained-delivery form of pure retinol in a protective capsule system which supports both the delivery and the effect of Granactive Retinoid.

Both forms of retinoid used avoid the irritation associated with retinoids (including retinol) use while delivering better visible results against signs of ageing.

This product uses next-generation retinoid active technologies which have been shown to achieve better reduction in signs of ageing than retinol without irritation. These technologies cannot be compared directly with retinol itself in terms of concentration because they include a different retinoid molecule, in a similar way that Retinol cannot be compared with Retinoic Acid in terms of concentration. If you have interest in a retinol product, please refer to our Retinol portfolio above which products contain pure retinol and cost less since many retinol technologies cost less than their next-generation counterparts like Granactive Retinoid.

Caution: Retinoids can make the skin more sensitive to UV radiation. Sun protection is particularly important when using retinoids. This product must not be used in conjunction with other retinoids including retinol or retinoic acid. This product is not a treatment for acne. Acne-prone skin may experience a temporary increase in acne during the first few weeks of using any form of retinoid including those used in this formulation.

Note: When pregnant or breastfeeding, it is recommended to avoid any skincare products containing retinoids such as formulations with Granactive Retinoid or Retinol.

Allergic ingredients not found