Ingredient Rating


Antioxidant,  Preservative, 

Butylated hydroxytoluene, a potent synthetic antioxidant that also has health concerns when consumed orally. The amount of BHT uses in cosmetic products is typically 0.01-0.1%, and does not pose a risk to skin, nor does it penetrate skin far enough to be absorbed into the bloodstream.


Butylene Glycol

Texture Enhancer,  Moisturizer,  Solvent, 

Commonly-used ingredient that has multiple functions in cosmetics, including as a texture enhancer. It’s similar to propylene glycol, but has a lighter texture.


Citric Acid

Uncategorized,  Ph Adjusters, 

Extract derived from citrus fruits and used primarily in small amounts to adjust the pH of products to prevent them from being too alkaline.


Cocamidopropyl Betaine

Cleansing Agent,  Viscosity Control,  Surfactant,  Antistatic, 

Gentle surfactant used in skincare products, almost always as a secondary cleansing agent and lather booster. When used alone as the sole cleansing agent, it is too mild to clean adult skin and hair.


Decyl Glucoside

Cleansing Agent,  Surfactant, 

Sugar-derived ingredient used as a gentle detergent cleansing agent.


Disodium EDTA


Short for disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. Used as a chelating agent in cosmetic products, meaning it prevents ingredients in a formula from binding with trace elements (mainly minerals) that can be present in water. Studies have found that EDTAs, including disodium EDTA, as used in cosmetic formulations are safe.



Skin-Replenishing,  Skin-Restoring,  Moisturizer,  Solvent, 

Also called glycerol or glycerine, glycerin is a humectant thatŠ—Ès present in all natural lipids (fats), whether animal or vegetable. It can be derived from natural substances by hydrolysis of fats and by fermentation of sugars; it also can be synthetically manufactured, which is usually the case with modern-day skincare products.Glycerin is a skin-replenishing and restoring ingredient, meaning it is a substance found naturally in skin, helping to establish normal balance and hydration. ItŠ—Ès one of the many substances in skin that helps maintain a healthy look and feel, defending against dryness and working to maintain skinŠ—Ès moisture level. Essentially, glycerin is a master at hydration, and works best when combined with other replenishing and emollient ingredients.Some people wonder whether using products with glycerin takes too much water from skin when there isnŠ—Èt enough humidity in the air. This can occur with pure glycerin (100% concentrationŠ—”an amount thatŠ—Ès never used in skincare products). Any humectant (including glycerin) used in pure form can increase water loss by attracting water from the lower layers of skin into the surface layers when the climate is too arid (low humidity). For this reason, glycerin and humectants are typically used in concentrations of 5% or less and always combined with other ingredients to soften skin. In fact, glycerin combined with other emollients and/or oils is a fundamental cornerstone of most moisturizers.References for this information:International Journal of Cosmetic Science, August 2016, ePublicationBritish Journal of Dermatology, July 2008, pages 23-34Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology, June 2007, pages 75-82Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, June 2003, pages 7,360-7,365


Glyceryl Stearate Se

Emollient,  Emulsifier,  Thickeners/Emulsifier, 

Widely used ingredient that is a self-emulsifying (thatŠ—Ès what the Š—“SEŠ—


Hydroxypropyl Starch Phosphate

Thickeners/Emulsifier,  Viscosity Control, 

A lightweight, plant-based or synthetic starch ingredient that functions as a texture enhancer in cosmetics. It belongs to the chemical class carbohydrates and is used in all types of personal care products, including conditioners, facial care, body washes, sunscreens, and hairstyling products. This ingredient is also used to stabilize cosmetic products and may be listed as distarch phosphate or hydroxypropyl distarch phosphate.


Lauric Acid

Cleansing Agent,  Emulsifier,  Skin-Replenishing, 

One of several fatty acids found in coconut oil and other natural fats, lauric acid has multiple uses in cosmetics. Its natural bay leaf-like scent can be used in high amounts to add fragrance to products, but itŠ—Ès more often used as a base for cleansing agents, and, increasingly, for its skin-soothing actions. Some studies have shown it can also have antimicrobial activity.



Preservative,  Sensitizing, 

Preservative thatŠ—Ès generally recommended for use only in rinse-off products such as cleansers or shampoos. Methylisothiazolinone is known to be sensitizing when used in leave-on products.



Coloring Agents/Pigment,  Pigment, 

Earth-derived silicate minerals included in products to give them sparkle and shine as well as varying degrees of opacity. The amount and look of the shine mica provides depends on the color and how finely itŠ—Ès milled for use in liquid, cream, or powder products. It is considered safe for use in cosmetics, including those applied to the eyes and lips.



Texture Enhancer,  Moisturizer,  Solvent, 

Peg-32 also functions as an emulsifier, which is a type of ingredient that keeps unlike substances (such as oil and water) from separating.




Common cosmetics preservative thatŠ—Ès considered one of the least sensitizing for use in formulations. It does not release formaldehyde. Phenoxyethanol is approved worldwide (including in Japan and in the EU) for use in all types of water-based cosmetics, up to a 1% concentration.


Stearic Acid

Emollient,  Emulsifier,  Skin-Replenishing,  Thickeners/Emulsifier,  Viscosity Control,  Surfactant, 

Fatty acid used as an emollient and emulsifier. It has been shown to protect skin's surface against water loss and help shore up skin's protective barrier. Stearic acid may be synthetic or animal-derived.ξ


Titanium Dioxide

Coloring Agents/Pigment,  Sunscreen Active,  Thickeners/Emulsifier,  Pigment, 

Inert earth mineral used as a thickening, whitening, lubricating, and sunscreen ingredient in cosmetics. It protects skin from UVA and UVB radiation and is considered to have no risk of skin sensitivity. Because of its gentleness, titanium dioxide is an excellent sunscreen active for use on sensitive, redness-prone skin. ItŠ—Ès also great for use around the eyes, as it is highly unlikely to cause stinging.Titanium dioxide is typically micronized and coated for use in cosmetics products. The micronizing makes this somewhat heavy-feeling ingredient easier to spread on skin, plus a bit more cosmetically elegant. Micronized titanium dioxide also is much more stable and can provide better sun protection than non-micronized titanium dioxide. Micronized titanium dioxide does not penetrate skin so thereŠ—Ès no need to be concerned about it getting into your body. Even when titanium dioxide nanoparticles are used, the molecular size of the substance used to coat the nanoparticles is large enough to prevent them from penetrating beyond the uppermost layers of skin. This means youŠ—Ère getting the sun protection titanium dioxide provides without any risk of it causing harm to skin or your body.The coating process improves application, enhances sun protection, and also prevents the titanium dioxide from interacting with other ingredients in the presence of sunlight, thus enhancing its stability. It not only makes this ingredient much more pleasant to use for sunscreen, but also improves efficacy and eliminates safety concerns. Common examples of ingredients used to coat titanium dioxide are alumina, dimethicone, silica, and trimethoxy capryl silane.Titanium dioxide as used in sunscreens is commonly modified with other ingredients to ensure efficacy and stability. Examples of what are known as surface modifier ingredients used for titanium dioxide include stearic acid, isostearic acid, polyhydroxystearic acid, and dimethicone/methicone copolymer.Some websites and doctors maintain that titanium dioxide is inferior to zinc oxide, another mineral sunscreen whose core characteristics are similar to those of titanium dioxide. The reality is titanium dioxide is a great broad-spectrum SPF ingredient and is widely used in all manner of sun-protection products. What gets confusing for some consumers is trying to decipher research that ranks sunscreen ingredients by a UV spectrum graph. By most standards, broad-spectrum coverage for any sunscreen ingredient is defined as one that surpasses 360 nanometers (abbreviated as Š—“nm,Š—



Solvent,  Miscellaneous, 

Most widely used cosmetic ingredient; water is almost always listed first on an ingredient label because it is usually the ingredient with the highest concentration in the formula. Despite claims of skinŠ—Ès need for hydration and claims regarding special types of water, it turns out that water may not be an important ingredient for skin. Only a 10% concentration of water in the outer layer of skin is necessary for softness and pliability in this part of the epidermis. Studies that have compared the water content of dry skin with that of normal or oily skin do not find a statistically significant difference in moisture levels between them.


Hydroxypropyl Methylcellulose

Viscosity Control, 



Sodium Cocoyl Glycinate


Sodium Acetylated Hyaluronate

Moisturizer,  Viscosity Control, 

Palm Stearic Acid

Emulsifier,  Viscosity Control, 

Potassium Cocoyl Glycinate

Emollient,  Surfactant, 

PEG 400


Sodium Lauroyl Aspartate


No Match
No Match

Rich, creamy cleanser with foaming action – rinses clean
Free from fragrance, alcohol, parabens, sulfates, dyes, soap, and mineral oil
Suitable for all skin types

Use every morning and evening.
Moisten face and hands with lukewarm water. Apply a pea-size amount into palm and work into lather. Gently massage onto face, using circular motion. Rinse and pat dry.

Allergic ingredients not found