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Ingredient
Antioxidant,  Emollient,  Plant Extract,  Skin-Soothing,  Astringent, 

Aesculus Hippocastanum

Good

Plant Extract,  Fragrance,  Astringent,  Anti, 

Arnica

Poor

Extract or oil obtained from the flowering plant Arnica montana. There is research showing that when arnica is taken orally before surgery it soothes sensitivity. However, in high amounts it is a risk for skin sensitivity.

Antioxidant,  Preservative, 

BHT

Average

Butylated hydroxytoluene, a potent synthetic antioxidant that also has health concerns when consumed orally. The amount of BHT uses in cosmetic products is typically 0.01-0.1%, and does not pose a risk to skin, nor does it penetrate skin far enough to be absorbed into the bloodstream.

Texture Enhancer,  Moisturizer,  Solvent, 

Butylene Glycol

Good

Commonly-used ingredient that has multiple functions in cosmetics, including as a texture enhancer. It’s similar to propylene glycol, but has a lighter texture.

Fragrance: Synthetic And Fragrant Plant Extract,  Fragrance, 

Butylphenyl Methylpropional

Poor

Synthetic fragrance ingredient with a strong floral scent. (Also goes by the name 2-(4-tert-Butylbenzyl) propionaldehyde or lilial.) Butylphenyl methylpropionalŠ—Ès use in cosmetics is restricted due to concerns over sensitivity.ξ

Emollient,  Texture Enhancer, 

Cetearyl Ethylhexanoate

Good

Oil-like liquid that functions as an emollient to defend skin against moisture loss. Also adds an elegant slip to creams and lotions.

Emollient, 

Cetyl Palmitate

Good

The ester of cetyl palmitate and palmitic acid, this thickener and emollient helps smooth and condition dry skin. The ingredients that comprise cetyl palmitate are naturally-occurring fatty acids. It may be derived from animals but can also (and is usually) derived from plants or manufactured synthetically.

Fragrance: Synthetic And Fragrant Plant Extract,  Fragrance, 

Citronellol

Poor

A volatile fragrance chemical extracted from geranium, rose, and other plants, citronellol has a characteristic grassy, citrus-like scent. Applied to skin, it can cause aggravation when exposed to air. This exposure causes the unstable citronellol molecule to oxidize, which is believed to trigger aggravation on skin.

Emollient,  Silicone, 

Dimethicone

Good

A type of silicone, dimethicone is one of the most frequently used emollient ingredients in moisturizers due to its gentleness and effectiveness. Dimethicone is considered a synthetic ingredient, even though itŠ—Ès derived from natural silicon.

Cleansing Agent,  Surfactant, 

Disodium Cocoamphodiacetate

Good

Mild detergent cleansing agent derived from coconut; most often used in facial cleansers.

Emollient,  Texture Enhancer,  Thickeners/Emulsifier, 

Ethylhexyl Stearate

Good

Preservative, 

Ethylparaben

Good

Parabens are a group of controversial preservatives that include butylparaben, isobutylparaben, propylparaben, methylparaben, and ethylparaben. All of these were at one time the most widely used group of preservatives used in cosmetics. Parabens were so popular because of their gentle, non-sensitizing, and highly effective profile in comparison to other preservatives but also because they were derived naturally from plants, a rare phenomenon for a preservative. Parabens are found in plants in the form of p-hydroxybenzoic acid (PHBA), a chemical that breaks down to become parabens for a plants own protection. Over the past 10 years parabens have become criticized and condemned for use in cosmetics due to their alleged relation to health concerns affecting women and men. The research about parabens is conflicting and polarizing. Some research indicates they are safe as used in cosmetics and are preferred over other preservatives to keep a formula stable. These studies also showed parabens did not have any effect when compared to natural hormones in the body. However, other research has concluded they are indeed problematic: Some studies determined a 100% concentration of parabens caused skin samples (meaning not intact skin on a person) to break down. However, these studies donŠ—Èt apply to the tiny amount (1% or less) of parabens typically used in cosmetics. In low amounts, parabens were not shown to harm skin; in fact, they offer a benefit due to their ability to thwart the growth of mold, fungi, and harmful pathogens. Other studies casting parabens in a negative light were based on force-feeding them to rats, a practice that is not only cruel but unrelated to what happens when parabens are applied to skin. There are studies indicating absorption of parabens through skin associated with application of skincare products, but those studies did not take into consideration that parabens are still used as food-grade preservatives or found naturally in plants and that could have been the source not the cosmetics. We also looked at studies showing other questionable effects but those were done in vitro meaning in a petri dish or, again, animal studies in species whose biologic makeup does not closely relate to people. We appreciate the concern about parabens and understand if people choose to avoid them. At PaulaŠ—Ès Choice Skincare we choose not to use parabens, but that decision is based on other reasons than the scare tactics rampant on the internet. References for this information: Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology, May 2017, 320-325 Annual Review of Food Science Technology, February 2017, pages 371-390 Journal of Applied Toxicology, April 2017, ePublication Environmental Science and Technology, April 2017, page 4009-4017 Dermatitis, November-December 2015, pages 254-259 Toxicology Letters, December 2013, pages 295-305 Skin Therapy Letter, July-August 2013, pages 5-7 Journal of Agricultural Food Chemistry, June 2008, pages 4631-4636 International Journal of Toxicology, April 2008, pages 1-82 http://www.cosmeticsinfo.org/paraben-information

Fragrance: Synthetic And Fragrant Plant Extract,  Sensitizing,  Fragrance, 

Fragrance

Poor

One or a blend of volatile and/or fragrant plant oils (or synthetically derived oils) that impart aroma and odor to products. These are often skin sensitizers because they are composed of hundreds of individual chemical components. Fragrance is a leading source of sensitivity to cosmetics.

Fragrance: Synthetic And Fragrant Plant Extract,  Sensitizing,  Fragrance, 

Geraniol

Average

A volatile fragrance ingredient extracted from geranium, geraniol is capable of causing sensitivity when applied to skin. However, the risk of such reaction has to do with depth of penetration into skin, and geraniol doesnŠ—Èt penetrate skin easily. As such, although itŠ—Ès not a great ingredient to see on a label if you have sensitive skin, it isnŠ—Èt among the most troublesome fragrance ingredients when used in low concentrations. Despite the lesser concern, research has shown that, like many fragrant oil components, geraniol can oxidize in the presence of air, causing damage when appied to skin's surface.

Antioxidant,  Plant Extract,  Skin-Soothing,  Anti, 

Ginkgo Biloba Leaf

Best

Potent, plant-derived antioxidant and soothing ingredient derived from the ginkgo plant.

Skin-Replenishing,  Skin-Restoring,  Moisturizer,  Solvent, 

Glycerin

Best

Also called glycerol or glycerine, glycerin is a humectant thatŠ—Ès present in all natural lipids (fats), whether animal or vegetable. It can be derived from natural substances by hydrolysis of fats and by fermentation of sugars; it also can be synthetically manufactured, which is usually the case with modern-day skincare products.Glycerin is a skin-replenishing and restoring ingredient, meaning it is a substance found naturally in skin, helping to establish normal balance and hydration. ItŠ—Ès one of the many substances in skin that helps maintain a healthy look and feel, defending against dryness and working to maintain skinŠ—Ès moisture level. Essentially, glycerin is a master at hydration, and works best when combined with other replenishing and emollient ingredients.Some people wonder whether using products with glycerin takes too much water from skin when there isnŠ—Èt enough humidity in the air. This can occur with pure glycerin (100% concentrationŠ—”an amount thatŠ—Ès never used in skincare products). Any humectant (including glycerin) used in pure form can increase water loss by attracting water from the lower layers of skin into the surface layers when the climate is too arid (low humidity). For this reason, glycerin and humectants are typically used in concentrations of 5% or less and always combined with other ingredients to soften skin. In fact, glycerin combined with other emollients and/or oils is a fundamental cornerstone of most moisturizers.References for this information:International Journal of Cosmetic Science, August 2016, ePublicationBritish Journal of Dermatology, July 2008, pages 23-34Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology, June 2007, pages 75-82Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, June 2003, pages 7,360-7,365

Emollient,  Emulsifier,  Plant Extract,  Moisturizer,  Solvent, 

Glycine Soja Seed

Best

Antioxidant,  Plant Extract,  Sensitizing,  Astringent,  Anti, 

Hamamelis Virginiana

Poor

Plant Extract,  Sensitizing,  Astringent,  Anti, 

Hedera Helix

Poor

Antioxidant,  Emollient,  Plant Extract,  Sensitizing,  Astringent,  Anti, 

Hypericum

Good

Preservative, 

Isobutylparaben

Good

Parabens are a group of controversial preservatives that include butylparaben, isobutylparaben, propylparaben, methylparaben, and ethylparaben. All of these were at one time the most widely used group of preservatives used in cosmetics. Parabens were so popular because of their gentle, non-sensitizing, and highly effective profile in comparison to other preservatives but also because they were derived naturally from plants, a rare phenomenon for a preservative. Parabens are found in plants in the form of p-hydroxybenzoic acid (PHBA), a chemical that breaks down to become parabens for a plants own protection. Over the past 10 years parabens have become criticized and condemned for use in cosmetics due to their alleged relation to health concerns affecting women and men. The research about parabens is conflicting and polarizing. Some research indicates they are safe as used in cosmetics and are preferred over other preservatives to keep a formula stable. These studies also showed parabens did not have any effect when compared to natural hormones in the body. However, other research has concluded they are indeed problematic: Some studies determined a 100% concentration of parabens caused skin samples (meaning not intact skin on a person) to break down. However, these studies donŠ—Èt apply to the tiny amount (1% or less) of parabens typically used in cosmetics. In low amounts, parabens were not shown to harm skin; in fact, they offer a benefit due to their ability to thwart the growth of mold, fungi, and harmful pathogens. Other studies casting parabens in a negative light were based on force-feeding them to rats, a practice that is not only cruel but unrelated to what happens when parabens are applied to skin. There are studies indicating absorption of parabens through skin associated with application of skincare products, but those studies did not take into consideration that parabens are still used as food-grade preservatives or found naturally in plants and that could have been the source not the cosmetics. We also looked at studies showing other questionable effects but those were done in vitro meaning in a petri dish or, again, animal studies in species whose biologic makeup does not closely relate to people. We appreciate the concern about parabens and understand if people choose to avoid them. At PaulaŠ—Ès Choice Skincare we choose not to use parabens, but that decision is based on other reasons than the scare tactics rampant on the internet. References for this information: Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology, May 2017, 320-325 Annual Review of Food Science Technology, February 2017, pages 371-390 Journal of Applied Toxicology, April 2017, ePublication Environmental Science and Technology, April 2017, page 4009-4017 Dermatitis, November-December 2015, pages 254-259 Toxicology Letters, December 2013, pages 295-305 Skin Therapy Letter, July-August 2013, pages 5-7 Journal of Agricultural Food Chemistry, June 2008, pages 4631-4636 International Journal of Toxicology, April 2008, pages 1-82 http://www.cosmeticsinfo.org/paraben-information

Cleansing Agent,  Emollient,  Texture Enhancer,  Thickeners/Emulsifier,  Solvent, 

Isohexadecane

Good

Synthetic, dry-finish ingredient with a powder-like finish. Used as a cleansing agent and texture enhancer in cosmetics, particularly those for oily skin. The size of isohexadecane keeps it from penetrating too far into the skin, so it can be a good ingredient to keep other ingredients, like certain antioxidants, on skinŠ—Ès surface.

Fragrance: Synthetic And Fragrant Plant Extract,  Sensitizing,  Fragrance, 

Linalool

Poor

Fragrant component of lavender and coriander that can be a potent skin sensitizer.

Preservative, 

Methylparaben

Good

Parabens are a group of controversial preservatives that include butylparaben, isobutylparaben, propylparaben, methylparaben, and ethylparaben. All of these were at one time the most widely used group of preservatives used in cosmetics. Parabens were so popular because of their gentle, non-sensitizing, and highly effective profile in comparison to other preservatives but also because they were derived naturally from plants, a rare phenomenon for a preservative. Parabens are found in plants in the form of p-hydroxybenzoic acid (PHBA), a chemical that breaks down to become parabens for a plants own protection. Over the past 10 years parabens have become criticized and condemned for use in cosmetics due to their alleged relation to health concerns affecting women and men. The research about parabens is conflicting and polarizing. Some research indicates they are safe as used in cosmetics and are preferred over other preservatives to keep a formula stable. These studies also showed parabens did not have any effect when compared to natural hormones in the body. However, other research has concluded they are indeed problematic: Some studies determined a 100% concentration of parabens caused skin samples (meaning not intact skin on a person) to break down. However, these studies donŠ—Èt apply to the tiny amount (1% or less) of parabens typically used in cosmetics. In low amounts, parabens were not shown to harm skin; in fact, they offer a benefit due to their ability to thwart the growth of mold, fungi, and harmful pathogens. Other studies casting parabens in a negative light were based on force-feeding them to rats, a practice that is not only cruel but unrelated to what happens when parabens are applied to skin. There are studies indicating absorption of parabens through skin associated with application of skincare products, but those studies did not take into consideration that parabens are still used as food-grade preservatives or found naturally in plants and that could have been the source not the cosmetics. We also looked at studies showing other questionable effects but those were done in vitro meaning in a petri dish or, again, animal studies in species whose biologic makeup does not closely relate to people. We appreciate the concern about parabens and understand if people choose to avoid them. At PaulaŠ—Ès Choice Skincare we choose not to use parabens, but that decision is based on other reasons than the scare tactics rampant on the internet. References for this information: Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology, May 2017, 320-325 Annual Review of Food Science Technology, February 2017, pages 371-390 Journal of Applied Toxicology, April 2017, ePublication Environmental Science and Technology, April 2017, page 4009-4017 Dermatitis, November-December 2015, pages 254-259 Toxicology Letters, December 2013, pages 295-305 Skin Therapy Letter, July-August 2013, pages 5-7 Journal of Agricultural Food Chemistry, June 2008, pages 4631-4636 International Journal of Toxicology, April 2008, pages 1-82 http://www.cosmeticsinfo.org/paraben-information

Emollient,  Texture Enhancer,  Synthetic Ester, 

Myristyl Myristate

Good

Used in cosmetics as a texture enhancer and emollient. It has a wetter feel and is best for dry skin.

Antioxidant,  Plant Extract,  Antistatic, 

Oryzanol

Good

Component of plants and their products, such as rice bran, that has potent antioxidant properties.

Cleansing Agent,  Emollient,  Emulsifier,  Skin-Replenishing, 

Palmitic Acid

Good

Fatty acid found naturally in skin and used as the basis for many palmitate ingredients, such as isopropyl palmitate. Palmitic acid has many functions in cosmetics, from detergent cleansing agent to emollient. In a cleanser, it has the potential to be drying depending on what itŠ—Ès combined with and the cleanserŠ—Ès pH level. In moisturizers, palmitic acid is a very good emollient.

Preservative, 

Phenoxyethanol

Good

Common cosmetics preservative that's considered one of the least sensitizing for use in formulations. It does not release formaldehyde. Phenoxyethanol is approved worldwide (including in Japan and in the EU) for use in all types of water-based cosmetics, up to a 1% concentration.

Plant Extract, 

Plankton

Good

A marine species known as Thalasso plankton and derived from various algae, seaweed, or marine skeletons. There is no research showing plankton extract has any benefit for skin but, like most forms of algae, it can have moisture-binding properties. Although that's good, keep in mind plankton ism't a miracle (not even a minor one) or a must-have ingredient for skin.

Emollient,  Uncategorized,  Viscosity Control, 

Propylene Glycol Dicaprylate/Dicaprate

Good

Gel-textured ingredient used in many lightweight moisturizers. ItŠ—Ès a mix of propylene glycol and capric acid, a fatty acid derived from plants.

Antioxidant,  Skin-Replenishing,  Skin-Restoring,  Moisturizer, 

Sodium Hyaluronate

Best

Salt form of skin-replenishing ingredient hyaluronic acid; considered more effective for skin than pure hyaluronic acid due to its greater compatibility. References for this information:

Antioxidant,  Vitamin,  Moisturizer, 

Tocopheryl Acetate

Best

Antioxidant,  Vitamin,  Moisturizer, 

Tocopheryl Lineolate

Best

Antioxidant,  Emollient,  Plant Extract,  Moisturizer, 

Vitis Vinifera

Best

Latin name for the vines that produce wine grapes. More commonly known as grape seed oil or grape seed extract.

Solvent,  Miscellaneous, 

Water

Good

Most widely used cosmetic ingredient; water is almost always listed first on an ingredient label because it is usually the ingredient with the highest concentration in the formula. Despite claims of skinŠ—Ès need for hydration and claims regarding special types of water, it turns out that water may not be an important ingredient for skin. Only a 10% concentration of water in the outer layer of skin is necessary for softness and pliability in this part of the epidermis. Studies that have compared the water content of dry skin with that of normal or oily skin do not find a statistically significant difference in moisture levels between them.

Fragrance,  Solvent, 

Benzyl Benzoate

Fragrance, 

Citral

Emulsifier,  Surfactant, 

Steareth-21

Preservative, 

Sodium Propylparaben

Preservative, 

Sodium Butylparaben

Fragrance, 

Amyl Cinnamyl Alcohol

Ph Adjusters, 

Tromethamine

Emulsifier,  Viscosity Control,  Surfactant, 

Cetyl Stearyl Alcohol

Viscosity Control, 

Potassium Carbomer

Emulsifier,  Viscosity Control, 

Palm Stearic Acid

Antioxidant,  Emollient,  Emulsifier,  Moisturizer, 

Soy Lecithin

Which skin type is it good for?
✔ Normal
✔ Oily
✔ Combination
✔ Dry
✔ Sensitive

What it is:
A nighttime face treatment to help reduce the look of fatigue.

Solutions for:
- Dullness and uneven texture

Midnight Secret Late Night Recovery Treatment reduces the appearance of puffiness and smooths away visible signs of tiredness so you wake up looking rested with a revitalized complexion and smoother skin. It’s formulated with a blend of effective ingredients, including hydronoctine complex, to promote skin recovery in record time and is infused with a refined lavender fragrance by Guerlain's touch of tonka bean, known for its energizing and calming effect.

Allergic ingredients not found