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Ingredient
Texture Enhancer,  Viscosity Control, 

Acrylates/C10-30 Alkyl Acrylate Crosspolymer

Good

A synthetic ingredient used to enhance the texture of skincare and haircare products. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review has deemed it safe as it is currently used in cosmetics.

Fragrance: Synthetic And Fragrant Plant Extract,  Sunscreen Active, 

Benzyl Salicylate

Poor

A volatile fragrance chemical with a sweet, floral odor used to impart scent to cosmetic products and perfumes. Applied topically, benzyl salicylate can cause negative reactions, even in small amounts. Interestingly, you can find research showing that this fragrance ingredient did not cause observable skin sensitivity under conditions of a patch test on human skin; however, this research was conducted by the Research Institute for Fragrance Materials, an independent research group thatŠ—Ès supported by suppliers of fragrances and products that contain fragrances.

Antioxidant,  Preservative, 

BHT

Average

Butylated hydroxytoluene, a potent synthetic antioxidant that also has health concerns when consumed orally. The amount of BHT uses in cosmetic products is typically 0.01-0.1%, and does not pose a risk to skin, nor does it penetrate skin far enough to be absorbed into the bloodstream.

Texture Enhancer,  Moisturizer,  Solvent, 

Butylene Glycol

Good

Commonly-used ingredient that has multiple functions in cosmetics, including as a texture enhancer. It’s similar to propylene glycol, but has a lighter texture.

Emollient,  Plant Extract,  Texture Enhancer,  Fragrance, 

Caprylic/Capric Triglyceride

Best

Derived from coconut oil and glycerin, itŠ—Ès considered an excellent emollient and skin-replenishing ingredient. ItŠ—Ès included in cosmetics due to its mix of fatty acids that skin can use to replenish its surface and resist moisture loss. Caprylic/capric triglyceride can also function as a thickener, but its chief job is to moisturize and replenish skin. This ingredientŠ—Ès value for skin is made greater by the fact that itŠ—Ès considered gentle.Reference for this information:Food and Chemical Toxicology, January 2000, issue 1, pages 79-98

Emollient,  Plant Extract,  Preservative,  Moisturizer, 

Caprylyl Glycol

Good

Skin and hair conditioning agent that may be plant-derived or synthetic. Often used as part of a preservative blend in cosmetics.

Emollient,  Silicone, 

Caprylyl Methicone

Good

Coloring Agents/Pigment,  Pigment, 

Caramel

Good

Natural coloring agent.

Fragrance: Synthetic And Fragrant Plant Extract,  Plant Extract,  Astringent, 

Citrus Aurantium

Poor

Bitter orange extract. It can have antioxidant properties when eaten (Source: Journal of Agricultural Food Chemistry, December 1999, pages 5239Š—–5244); however, used topically its methanol content makes it potentially sensitizing for skin

Emollient,  Fragrance: Synthetic And Fragrant Plant Extract,  Plant Extract,  Fragrance,  Astringent, 

Citrus Medica Limonium

Poor

Antioxidant, 

Copper Gluconate

Good

Also known simply as copper, this mineral is an important trace element for human nutrition. The body needs copper to absorb and use iron, and copper is also a component of the powerful antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase. Copper gluconate is a potentially exciting anti-aging ingredient, but certainly not among the most well researched or proven when it comes to topical application.

Antioxidant,  Vitamin, 

D-Alpha-Tocopherol

Best

Antioxidant that's considered the most effective form of vitamin E.

Emollient,  Texture Enhancer,  Fragrance,  Synthetic Ester,  Solvent, 

Ethylhexyl Palmitate

Good

Mixture of a fatty alcohol and palmitic acid that functions as an emollient and texture enhancer. ThereŠ—Ès no research indicating this ingredient, which may be synthetic, plant-, or animal-derived, is a problem for skin.

Fragrance: Synthetic And Fragrant Plant Extract,  Sensitizing,  Fragrance, 

Fragrance

Poor

One or a blend of volatile and/or fragrant plant oils (or synthetically derived oils) that impart aroma and odor to products. These are often skin sensitizers because they are composed of hundreds of individual chemical components. Fragrance is a leading source of sensitivity to cosmetics.

Antioxidant,  Plant Extract,  Moisturizer, 

Glucosyl Hesperidin

Best

A water-soluble form of hesperidin, a flavonoid found in many citrus plants, as well as evening primrose oil. It has potential as an antioxidant. There are also studies showing it has skin-soothing benefits.

Skin-Replenishing,  Skin-Restoring,  Moisturizer,  Solvent, 

Glycerin

Best

Also called glycerol or glycerine, glycerin is a humectant thatŠ—Ès present in all natural lipids (fats), whether animal or vegetable. It can be derived from natural substances by hydrolysis of fats and by fermentation of sugars; it also can be synthetically manufactured, which is usually the case with modern-day skincare products.Glycerin is a skin-replenishing and restoring ingredient, meaning it is a substance found naturally in skin, helping to establish normal balance and hydration. ItŠ—Ès one of the many substances in skin that helps maintain a healthy look and feel, defending against dryness and working to maintain skinŠ—Ès moisture level. Essentially, glycerin is a master at hydration, and works best when combined with other replenishing and emollient ingredients.Some people wonder whether using products with glycerin takes too much water from skin when there isnŠ—Èt enough humidity in the air. This can occur with pure glycerin (100% concentrationŠ—”an amount thatŠ—Ès never used in skincare products). Any humectant (including glycerin) used in pure form can increase water loss by attracting water from the lower layers of skin into the surface layers when the climate is too arid (low humidity). For this reason, glycerin and humectants are typically used in concentrations of 5% or less and always combined with other ingredients to soften skin. In fact, glycerin combined with other emollients and/or oils is a fundamental cornerstone of most moisturizers.References for this information:International Journal of Cosmetic Science, August 2016, ePublicationBritish Journal of Dermatology, July 2008, pages 23-34Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology, June 2007, pages 75-82Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, June 2003, pages 7,360-7,365

Fragrance: Synthetic And Fragrant Plant Extract,  Sensitizing,  Fragrance,  Solvent, 

Limonene

Poor

Chemical constituent of many natural fragrant ingredients, notably citrus oils such as lemon (d-limonene) and pine trees or species of the mint family (l-limonene).ξ

Fragrance: Synthetic And Fragrant Plant Extract,  Sensitizing,  Fragrance, 

Linalool

Poor

Fragrant component of lavender and coriander that can be a potent skin sensitizer.

Texture Enhancer,  Moisturizer, 

Pentylene Glycol

Good

A synthetic skin-replenishing agent and solvent.

Preservative, 

Phenoxyethanol

Good

Common cosmetics preservative that's considered one of the least sensitizing for use in formulations. It does not release formaldehyde. Phenoxyethanol is approved worldwide (including in Japan and in the EU) for use in all types of water-based cosmetics, up to a 1% concentration.

Plant Extract,  Moisturizer, 

Saccharomyces Officinarum Ferment

Average

Derived from the sugarcane plant. Glycolic acid is also derived from sugarcane, but sugarcane extract does not have the same exfoliating properties as glycolic acid. There is no research showing that sugarcane extract has any benefit for skin.

Antioxidant,  Skin-Replenishing,  Skin-Restoring,  Moisturizer, 

Sodium Hyaluronate

Best

Salt form of skin-replenishing ingredient hyaluronic acid; considered more effective for skin than pure hyaluronic acid due to its greater compatibility. References for this information:

Miscellaneous, 

Tetrasodium EDTA

Good

Chelating agent used to prevent minerals present in formulations from bonding to other ingredients.

Antioxidant,  Vitamin,  Moisturizer, 

Tocopheryl Acetate

Best

Plant Extract,  Astringent, 

Vaccinium Myrtillus

Good

Solvent,  Miscellaneous, 

Water

Good

Most widely used cosmetic ingredient; water is almost always listed first on an ingredient label because it is usually the ingredient with the highest concentration in the formula. Despite claims of skinŠ—Ès need for hydration and claims regarding special types of water, it turns out that water may not be an important ingredient for skin. Only a 10% concentration of water in the outer layer of skin is necessary for softness and pliability in this part of the epidermis. Studies that have compared the water content of dry skin with that of normal or oily skin do not find a statistically significant difference in moisture levels between them.

Fragrance, 

Citral

Emulsifier,  Surfactant, 

Steareth-21

Surfactant, 

Ceteth-20

Emulsifier,  Viscosity Control,  Solvent, 

Glyceryl Stearate & PEG-100 Stearate

Exfoliant, 

Acer Saccharinum

Ph Adjusters, 

Tromethamine

Emulsifier,  Viscosity Control,  Surfactant, 

Cetyl Stearyl Alcohol

Viscosity Control, 

Sodium Polyacrylate Starch

Emulsifier,  Viscosity Control, 

Palm Stearic Acid

Moisturizer, 

Polyglycerin-3

Moisturizer,  Antistatic, 

D-Panthenol

Viscosity Control,  Solvent, 

1,3-Propanediol

Viscosity Control, 

Natural Xanthan Gum

A lightweight moisturizer with vitamins C, E, and B5 that instantly awakens skin for a daily dose of glow.

Allergic ingredients not found